8 Top Tips for a Happy and Healthy Summer Holiday!

Whether you’re off on an exotic adventure or opting for a staycation – your
summer holiday is arguably the most precious time of the year! A chance to
reconnect with friends and family, explore pastures new and enjoy some rare
time to relax and unwind – our holidays are sacred for sure. Here’s our top ten
tips for maximising health and happiness, wherever you get to this summer!

1. Avoid Beach Body Diets

OK, so this is one for before you go! For some of us summer holidays and beach body diets go hand-in-hand. But seasonal slimming could be doing us more harm than good. Not only are crash diets incredibly arduous and depriving, but they’re also unsustainable and may even lead to weight gain in the long-term. What’s more, setting unrealistic goals and not meeting them prior to your hols could have an overall negative impact on self-esteem and body confidence. There really is no secret to weight loss and no miracle diet – honest! Instead, opt for a diet full of delicious real food – low in harmful fats, sugars and processed food that drives weight gain. Oh – and move more!

2. Visit the Local Market

Getting away is a great opportunity to explore the cuisine of other cultures, including the amazing fresh ingredients they use to create it. Many of the foods we are lucky enough to have imported can be found at local markets abroad. With zero air miles and maximum freshness, it’s your opportunity to cook up a foreign feast. What’s more, learning about local food on holiday is a great way to explore lesser-known favourites that could be a sustainable substitute for your home comfort ingredients – such as sustainable fish, meat and – if you’re brave – insects!

3. Exercise to Explore

Travelling by foot, bike or boat is a great way to get trekking, rowing and cycling through your new environment. Not only will this keep you active but it’s often the cheapest way to travel and the best way to discover hidden gems, which can be missed when travelling by car or train. Don’t forget to take a map or guide to make sure you don’t get lost in all the adventure!

4. Stay Hydrated

We need to be making sure we up our fluids on holiday – besides the bellinis! Let’s face it, us Brits aren’t exposed to a great deal of heat at home. So, it’s easy to continue as you were when on holiday, sipping leisurely whilst the sun beats down and sweat floods around you! When we do sweat we lose a lot of electrolytes and water – which must be replenished to keep us going. The good news is that we are intelligent creatures and have evolved to recognise thirst as a reliable prompt for drinking enough – so don’t ignore those dry-mouth warnings! If you are planning on partying, try to swap out every few drinks for a good old water, to avoid dehydration and well – keep you on your feet! (Mojitos we are looking at you!)

5. Don’t Forget Sunscreen!

We know what you’re thinking; “OK mum, will do!” It goes without saying that sunburn is something you want to avoid on your jollies. Aside from being painful and dangerous, severe sunburn could mean sitting in the shade for the rest of your holiday. Protect yourself with an appropriately UVB-rated sunscreen, apply regularly and top-up after a dip in the pool. Not only will this protect your skin from harm, but it will also help to minimise the ageing effects of the sun.

6. Put the Active in Activities!

Whether its aqua Zumba, kayaking, mountain-climbing or dancing the night away – our holidays are a great opportunity to move more! Ever convince yourself you’d be an avid surfer or Pilates pro if you could do it all beneath the backdrop of a sumptuous sunset? Now’s your chance! Dive in the water, swim through those caves and make the most of moving more without being chained to a treadmill!

7. Break Away from the Bar

Most of us enjoy a drink or two (or three!) during our holidays. We’re not here to turn you against alcohol, promise! In fact, unwinding with a nice drink and treating yourself every now and then is just as important as staying healthy most of the time. What we will say is that hitting the bar hard could leave you tired, demotivated and lacking that holiday get-up-and-go the morning after. Some good ideas for staying relatively on the wagon include staying alcohol-free until a certain time, avoiding the shots and novelty drinks and opting for a coffee or smoothie in place of a jaeger bomb every now and then!

8. Rest and Relaxation

Last and certainly not least is rest and relaxation. These are things which are often at the forefront of our mind pre-holiday but get lost along the way during our stay. Making the most of your break may mean packing in as many parties, activities and as much sight-seeing as possible – but this can encroach on your time to unwind! Make sure you have a minimum of one whole day free to lay in the sun, read a good book or take in the sights and sounds without a care in the world! Of all the memories you make on your travels, this could be the one which sticks with you when you’re back at your desk or stuck in the rat-race – so enjoy it while it lasts!

Thanks for reading, we hope we’ve inspired you to squeeze every last drop of
pleasure from your summer holiday! Remember, it’s all about balance – you want
your break to be as loud and as quiet as can be, and as calm and chaotic as can
be! Whatever you get up and wherever you go, we wish you a happy and healthy
holiday!

Author: Stephanie Masterman @NutriNoggin
Dated: 01/07/2019
References

 

  • How to #FeelGoodNKD and Get Summer Body Confident (link to NKD living post)
  • Mehta, T., Smith, D., Muhammad, J. and Casazza, K. (2014). Impact of weight cycling on risk of morbidity and mortality. Obesity Reviews, 15(11), pp.870-881.
  • Flament, F., Bazin, R., Rubert, Simonpietri, Piot, B. and Laquieze (2013). Effect of the sun on visible clinical signs of ageing in Caucasian skin. Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology, p.221.
  • Penning, R., McKinney, A. and Verster, J. (2012). Alcohol Hangover Symptoms and Their Contribution to the Overall Hangover Severity. Alcohol and Alcoholism, 47(3), pp.248-252.

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